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Navigating the Digital Age: A Consideration for Muslim Homeschooling Parents

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

In today’s fast-paced world, technology is an ever-present force that shapes our lives. The COVID-19 pandemic has further cemented its role as an essential tool for communication, learning, and entertainment. However, as Muslim homeschooling parents, it’s crucial to examine the potential consequences of excessive technology use on our children’s well-being and education. In this blog post, we’ll delve into findings from various sources, shedding light on why Muslim homeschooling parents should consider limiting their children’s exposure to technology.

The Radiofrequency (RF) Radiation Dilemma: Our trusty smartphones emit radiofrequency (RF) radiation, a type of electromagnetic radiation that has garnered attention in recent years. With the growing prevalence of smartphones, especially among children, there’s an emerging concern about the potential effects on brain functioning. Excessive smartphone use, leading to increased exposure to RF radiation, has been linked to disrupted sleep patterns, compromised cognitive abilities, and a heightened risk of mental illnesses such as depression, anxiety, Alzheimer’s disease, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)12. What makes this issue even more alarming is that children, due to their smaller head size, higher brain conductivity, and thinner skulls compared to adults, are more susceptible to the adverse effects of RF radiation3.

The Looming Threat of Brain Tumors: Research has drawn disturbing connections between RF emissions and an elevated risk of brain tumours, particularly in children and adolescents. The susceptibility of young individuals to these risks is attributed to their higher RF exposure, smaller head sizes, and thinner skulls. These findings underscore the importance of taking precautions to mitigate these risks, especially in children4.

Television’s Role in Attention Problems: Television, a pervasive form of entertainment, has also come under scrutiny for its impact on attention-related issues in children and adolescents. Additionally, permitting young children to watch television before the age of three can have noticeable repercussions on their cognitive development5.

The Pitfalls of Video Games: A telling study offered insights into the pitfalls of unrestricted video game access for children. When children were immediately given video game consoles, significant reductions in their reading and writing skills became evident. Teachers also noted greater learning difficulties in these children6.

Long-Term Health Risks on the Horizon: The long-term health risks associated with technology use are still emerging, but there are troubling signs. Adults’ constant use of mobile phones has conditioned children to view these devices as integral to daily life. Additionally, children’s unique physical characteristics, such as smaller head size, thinner skull bones, and higher brain conductivity, expose them to higher RF radiation absorption7. Furthermore, the developing brains of children are more sensitive to toxins, a vulnerability that persists until they reach around 20 years of age. Disturbingly, research indicates that prolonged mobile and cordless phone use during childhood is linked to decreased survival rates in specific brain tumor cases, with the highest hazard ratio in individuals who first used such devices before the age of 208.

Education: Benefits vs. Risks: While technology undoubtedly offers educational benefits, it is crucial to weigh them against the associated risks. Typing, for instance, has been found to impair reading and writing skills, leading to superficial information processing. Learning through tools like Google has been shown to be less effective compared to traditional methods such as reading books, journals, or newspapers9.

In Conclusion: In light of these findings, it becomes clear that while technology is a powerful tool, it carries significant risks, especially for our children. Muslim homeschooling parents should consider limiting their children’s exposure to technology to protect their physical and mental health, as well as their educational development. As we navigate the digital age, let us prioritize our children’s well-being and growth by fostering a balanced and nurturing learning environment that extends beyond screens. Technology has its place, but sometimes, less truly is more when it comes to our children’s education and overall well-being.

  1. Spitzer, M. (2014). Information Technology in education: Risks and side effects. Trends in Neuroscience and Education, 3(3–4), 81–85. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tine.2014.09.002
    ↩︎
  2. Effects of mobile phones on children’s and adolescents’ health: A commentary. Child Development, 89(1), 137–140. https://doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12831 ↩︎
  3. Ibid ↩︎
  4. Ibid ↩︎
  5. Psychological and emotional effects of digital technology on children in COVID-19 pandemic. Brain Sciences, 11(9), 1126. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11091126 ↩︎
  6. Ibid ↩︎
  7. Effects of mobile phones on children’s and adolescents’ health: A commentary. Child Development, 89(1), 137–140. https://doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12831 ↩︎
  8. Spitzer, M. (2014). Information Technology in education: Risks and side effects. Trends in Neuroscience and Education, 3(3–4), 81–85. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tine.2014.09.002 ↩︎
  9. Ibid ↩︎

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